Chiriqui Watch Transition Time

UPDATE March 31, 2014: I have removed the Chiriquí Watch Tab from the tabs at the top of the screen. No one to this point has shown interest in administering and promoting the site.

In July of 2011, I set up Chiriqui Watch hoping that it would provide a medium that could be used to record incidents that affected everyone living in Chiriqui. Primarily I thought it would be a way of documenting and tracking crime.

My thought was that the more available online documentation, the better informed the province would be. Crime has definitely increased since I moved here and at the time I set it up there was no centralized location recording it.

My intention was that it would be a community resource and open to all to record what was happing in their area. It appears that either it was not promoted well enough, no one really saw a benefit in it or for what ever reason, it has not really gained the amount of use I had hoped for.

That being the case, I am either going to deactivate it or turn it over to some other interested party or parties. I will give it a couple weeks and if someone has an interest in taking it over, I will turn it over. If no interest is shown, I will deactivate it.

It was a worthwhile experiment, but I think it is time to change. HERE is the Chiriqui Watch website for possibly its last two weeks.

14 thoughts on “Chiriqui Watch Transition Time

  1. Great site Don and very valuable for expats who want to be aware and even more valuable to the Panamanian authorities to track criminal activity, trends and organization. I did crime stats and tracking while not glamorous it can be very useful in preventing or solving crimes. It would be shame to lose it. My 2 cents

  2. Do you host Chiriqui Watch with a hosting company? If so, what are the fees for the fees for the domain and the hosting plan? Through what method(s) hve you been getting the crime reports (ie website submissions, embassy reports, etc).

    I’m trying to determine the extent of upkeep of the site in case you do want to turn it over.

    Thanks in advance.

  3. *fees for the domain name and hosting plan

    Sorry for the repeat! I’ll blame my big thumbs and my mobile device 😉

  4. Don, I have been reading your blog religiously for a number of years. I know about ‘Alto al Crimen’ in Boquete, but I was not aware of Chiriqui Watch. (may have missed the posting) The benefit to the community is quite clear. Perhaps a little more publicity on this site would stimulate the reporting.

  5. @Dude -The site uses the Classic Version o fhttps://crowdmap.com. It is hosted by them and has had no hosting fees.

    Larson. Since 2011 I have had many posts related to Chiriqui Watch. I even made a FaceBook page for it. I has even had a location at the top of the Blog.

  6. Let’s check out “EDICIÓN #3, SEPTIEMBRE 2013” report of the “Observatorio de Seguridad Ciudadana” project run by “CÁMARA DE COMERCIO, INDUSTRIAS Y AGRICULTURA DE PANAMÁ / DIRECCIÓN DE ASUNTO JURÍDICOS, CABILDEO Y SEGURIDAD CIUDADANA”.

    The report is filed at http://www.panacamara.com/documentosxdescargar/boletinosc3.pdf .

    First the national view for all reported criminal incidents.

    GRÁFICO N° 1
    Comportamiento histórico de los Incidentes y Delitos
    registrados en la República de Panamá durante
    el primer semestre (Enero-Junio), Años 2009-2013.
    Fuente: Sistema Nacional Integrado de Estadística Criminal/ SIEC

    Un cálculo estimado de la tasa de incidentes por 100,000 habitantes destaca que el primer semestre de 2010 expresó 1,000.5 incidentes por 100,000 habitantes, mientras que el 2013 en el mismo período refleja una reducción significativa en 675.1 incidentes por 100,000 habitantes.

    The numbers for the several kinds of incidents are broken down by province. For example, the share of robbery reports in the Province of Panamá was down and that decrease sent Chiriquí up as was the case with other provinces.

    GRÁFICO N° 12
    Porcentaje de Robos denunciados en la República de
    Panamá, según provincia, primer semestre años 2012 y
    2013.
    Fuente: Sistema Nacional Integrado de Estadística Criminal/ SIEC

  7. Well Mateo, the best information about crime, usually comes from those living in a specific area. Many break-ins are never reported, especially by foreigners because it is too difficult or they are tourists.

    Crime Watch also allow for posting items of a suspicious nature, such as a car of a certain description.

    If your point was to say that crime is really on a downturn, I haven’t found that to be true and it really has no bearing on this post anyway.

  8. I tried to promote Chiriqui Watch on boquete.ning several times but the folks involved with Alto as Crimen seem to want to control reporting (or not reporting) crime in that district. My guess would have to be that they don’t want potential retirees to be scared away. Many expats living there now are involved in coffee production, car sales, rental properties and such so they have a vested interest in presenting Boquete as crime-free to maintain the flow of new expats.

    I recorded several crimes to Chiriqui Watch since you established it. I thought it was an excellent resource both to alert the residents to increased crime and to track the movement of criminal activities. Keeping the public aware of where crimes are occurring is more than half the battle in reducing crime in any area.

    Sad to see it go.

  9. They may well do that. AaC has a very tough mission, scare folks enough about the crime situation in Boquete that the new arrivals will buy into their service but not scare them so much that the stream of new money dries up. Very tricky. :O

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